How to Donate Food in Florida to Help Hurricane Fiona Victims

How to Donate Food in Florida to Help Hurricane Fiona Victims

With inflation approaching, housing crises and the holidays, local groups are running out of resources and needing help should displaced families arrive from Puerto Rico. A new rapid response truck is on standby in the rescue army in this hurricane season. “We can make 1,500 meals a day from this unit,” said Captain Ken Chapman. “It can reach places where perhaps our largest kitchen can’t.” As they find ways to improve resources, they need the community’s help to reach those in need. People in Puerto Rico are facing the devastation of Hurricane Fiona. “A new category of homelessness is emerging — people who never thought they would be homeless,” Chapman said. “So if we have a natural disaster, like a hurricane that is displacing people… the resources are really depleted.” Empty shelves are shown in “We want every family to leave with a full week of groceries and for the full week of groceries to be 21 meals,” said Father Jose Rodriguez, with Christ the King Episcopal Church. “Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, everywhere,” said Hernandez. “The number would rise if displaced families came from Puerto Rico to Central Florida. We’re talking about our neighbors — he might live,” Rodriguez said. Some of them are next to you or across the street to bring a loved one and now their home budget is pushed to the limit.” “They come and get food here because they are neighbors who feed families who feed friends.”

With inflation approaching, housing crises and the holidays, local groups are running out of resources and needing help should displaced families arrive from Puerto Rico.

New rapid response truck is on standby in the rescue army in this hurricane season.

“We can make 1,500 meals a day from this unit,” said Captain Ken Chapman. “It can reach places where perhaps our largest kitchen can’t.”

As they find ways to improve resources, they need the community’s help to reach those in need.

People in Puerto Rico are facing the devastation of Hurricane Fiona.

“A new class of homeless has emerged – “People who never thought they would be homeless,” Chapman said. “So if we have a natural disaster, like a hurricane that displaces people… the resources are really depleted.”

The empty shelves at the Healing Hunger Food Pantry show just how high the demand is.

“We want every family to leave with a full week of groceries and for the full week of groceries to be 21 meals,” said Father Jose Rodriguez, with Christ the King Episcopal Church.

The store’s manager, Fidel Hernandez, said more than 200 families from different backgrounds are served each month.

“Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, everywhere,” Hernandez said.

Rodriguez says the number will rise if displaced families from Puerto Rico come to Central Florida.

“We’re talking about our neighbors – some of them might live next door to you or across the street to bring a loved one and now their home budget is pushed to the limit,” Rodriguez said. “They are the ones who come and get the food here because they are neighbors who feed families who feed friends.”

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